Rahway River
Trout Unlimited #155

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Be Part of it •••••••••• Make a Difference •••••••••• Leave a Legacy
Rahway River Trout Unlimited is one of the newest New Jersey Trout Unlimited chapters. We are an organization of men and women that strive to protect our cold freshwater fisheries throughout the state. Our members meet once a month, discuss many topics from conservation to fishing. We also go on fishing trips throughout the year, conduct river cleanups, and partake in many other activities. If you like fishing or just want to give back to the environment then RRTU is for you.

If you live near one of the following towns and are a trout fisherman or care about conservation, we want you in our Rahway River Trout Unlimited Chapter of New Jersey :

Cranford, Westfield, Garwood, Fanwood, Kenilworth, Chatham, Iselin, Linden, Clark, Springfield, Union, Vauxhall, Mountainside, Elizabeth, Roselle, Roselle Park, Hillside, Scotch Plains and New Providence
  



Upcoming Events:

Rahway River Trout Unlimited
New Jersey

Monthly meetings are held on the 3rd Monday of every month.
These meetings start @ 7:30PM, at the...
 

Cranford Community Center

2nd Floor
220 Walnut Ave.
Cranford, NJ 07016
(908) 709-7283

Click Link for Google Map of the Community Center


Our presentations are free-of-charge to all interested fisherman regardless of whether or not you are a RRTU member. So bring a friend, come on out and enjoy yourself, learn a few new things, meet some new fishing buddies, and perhaps even consider
 joining

Trout Unlimited Chapter - #155.


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Our next general meeting is scheduled for...


 
Monday, September 19th
at 7:30 PM.

On the third Monday of each month the Rahway River Trout Unlimited Chapter holds its monthly general meeting at the Cranford Community Center at 7:30 pm. Following the agenda we usually have a guest speaker perform a presentation.


Hope to see you there...

Read more...
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Rahway River Trout Unlimited

Don't Forget to check out the RRTU Meetup site that lists all
events & meeting information
.....

Read more...

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Come join us for one of our Fly Tying nights at the Cranford Community Center!

Our next Fly Tying Nights will be


 

Monday, September 26th at 7:00 PM

Monday, October 3rd at 7:00 PM

Monday, October 24th at 7:00 PM


All are welcome!

The meetings are free and are open to all. All tying levels are welcome. We have extra materials and vices for those who need them and there are volunteers who will work with the new people who want to try fly tying. You don't have to be a TU member to join us. We have free coffee and donuts and always have a fly fishing DVD playing. This is a very informal get together with the purpose of sharing our hobby with other people who want to find out what it is all about in a laid back atmosphere. You will find it to be a very relaxing evening even if you don't want to tie flies. Come down and have a cup of coffee and meet a great bunch of guys, talk fishing or sports (no politics) or pick up some tying tips. This time of year is a great time to refill your fly boxes. Hope to see you there.

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Featured Story:



By Chris Wood

CEO, Trout Unlimited

 

Over the next 30 days, TU will be feeding you a heavy dose of public lands. From the Golden Trout wilderness in California to the Green mountains of Vermont, public lands are hugely important to wild and native fish. In most western states, public lands comprise more than 70 percent of the available habitat for trout, and virtually all of the strongholds for native trout.  

My father is the sixth generation of our family to grow up in Newark NJ. Growing up, the closest public land we had was a local county park called Tuers, where I shot countless hours of hoop. Except for visiting family in Ireland, I didn't leave the Garden State until college in Vermont, and there discovered the Green Mountain National Forest. I spent many hours in that forest catching native brook trout. 

After graduation I took a long, slow trip across the country with my dog, Gus, and a big box filled with Dinty Moore beef stew. Gus and I walked the Natchez Trace in Mississippi. We hiked the Smokies in Tennessee. We took pictures of fields of Black Eyed Susans in the Shenandoah. Swam in hot springs in Idaho and clamored over red rocks in Utah. Camped among the aspen in Colorado. Hiked old growth forests in Oregon, marveled at the coastal redwoods of California. 

All those places share one thing. They are public lands that belong to us all. For now. In recent years, more than 50 short-sighted bills have been introduced in state legislatures to transfer, sell, or otherwise take away your birthright—the public lands that are managed for us by the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. Not to be outdone, Congress has entertained similar proposals. Presidential candidates have campaigned on the issue. As much as we’d all like to think “that can’t happen,” the fact is that there are well-heeled special interests dedicated to seeing that it does.

Those who seek this so called “transfer” -- county supremacists, sagebrush rebels, and their contemporary cicadian progeny -- neglect an important fact. At no time did the Western federally managed public lands belong to the states. They were either ceded to the Union by eastern states or acquired through treaty, conquest or purchase by the federal government acting on behalf of the citizens of the United States.

Public lands are the best idea America ever had. For those of us who want to fish and hunt, camp and hike without having to beg or buy permission, they are a godsend. The ham-handed dialogue about transferring or divesting public lands that drives the debate today is unhelpful and unproductive.  To suggest that our land legacy—a legacy that a kid from New Jersey shares with a rancher in New Mexico—should be transferred or sold for a pittance is extreme and offensive.

For the next 30 days, tune into TU for a steady diet of why public lands matter. Share the stories, video, and photos with your friends. Let your member of Congress and elected leaders in your state know that the public lands are a birthright that belongs to all of us, and we are not willing sellers. 

Speak up for your public lands through our
online action center.
Tell Congress and the President to keep it public and include a message why America’s public lands matter to you. You can also
search for your elected officials

to get in touch and make your voice heard!

Women’s Initiative (WI) Program at New Jersey Trout Unlimited:
  
Be Part of it......
Trout Unlimited is America's leading coldwater conservation organization

Make a Difference.....
Be a grassroots advocate for protection of the environment

Leave a Legacy.....
Work to ensure we have clean, cold, fishable water for generations to come
 
   The main goal of the NJ State Council of Trout Unlimited Women’s Initiative is to provide support for chapters to recruit new members to TU as well as engage current members to network with other women and become involved in chapter projects and river outings.  As a grass roots effort campaign, the NJ State Council hopes to see an increase in women involvement and work to empower new leaders to share their passion for cold water conservation. Whether new to the sport or an experienced angler, the idea to unite women in the state and open communication will serve to enrich our membership. There are future plans to organize outings in Spring, which will give women in the state the opportunity to gather together for fishing and camaraderie.
     If you have any questions or are interested in learning more about the NJ TU Women’s Initiative Program, contact coordinator Kelly E. Buchta at kebuchta@njtu.org




 
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